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IAM422- Real Estate Investor Helps Other Investors Allocate Capital to Properties

Podcast Interview with Hunter Thompson

Hunter is a full-time real estate investor and founder of Asym Capital, a private equity firm based out of Los Angeles, CA. Since starting Asym, Hunter has helped more than 250 investors allocate capital to over 100 properties. He has personally raised more than $30mm in private capital and controls more than $75mm in commercial real estate.

Hunter has been featured in Forbes, Globe St., and Inside Self-Storage, as well as a variety of other media news outlets, podcasts, and radio shows.

Hunter is also the host of the Cash Flow Connections Real Estate Podcast, which helps investors learn the intricacies of commercial real estate from the comfort of their home, car, or office.

  • CEO Hack: Books – (1) Double Double by Cameron Herold (2) Miracle morning for entrepreneurs
  • CEO Nugget: ‘Who not how' way of thinking about things
  • CEO Defined: Focusing on different initiatives on your own schedule

Website: https://cfcmentorshipprogram.com

Podcast: www.cashflowconnections.com

https://cfcmentorshipprogram.com/111-questions


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Transcription

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Intro 00:02

Do you want to learn effective ways to build relationships, generate sales, and grow your business from successful entrepreneurs, startups, and CEOs without listening to a long, long, long interview? If so, you've come to the right place. Gresham Harkless values your time and is ready to share with you precisely the information you're in search of. This is the I AM CEO Podcast.

Gresham Harkless 00:29

Hello, this is Gresh from the I AM CEO podcast and I have a very special guest on the show today, I have Hunter Thompson of Asym Capital, Hunter it's awesome to have you on the show.

Hunter Thompson 00:38

Thanks again for having me on.

Gresham Harkless 00:40

No problem. Super excited to have you on it. What I wanted to do was just read a little bit more about Hunter so you can hear about all the awesome things that he's doing. Hunter is a full-time real estate investor and founder of Asym Capital, a private equity firm based out of Los Angeles, California. Since starting Asym, Hunter has helped more than 250 investors allocate capital to over 100 properties.

He has personally raised over $30 million in private capital in controls more than 75 million in commercial real estate. Hunter has been featured in Forbes, Globe Street, and Inside Self Storage, as well as a variety of other media outlets, podcasts, and radio shows. Hunter is also the host of the Cash Flow Connections real estate podcast, which helps investors learn the intricacies of commercial real estate from the comfort of their home, car, or even their office. Hunter, are you ready to speak to the I AM CEO community?

[restrict paid=”true”]

Hunter Thompson 01:26

Oh, yeah, let's do it.

Gresham Harkless 01:28

So to kick everything off, I want to hear a little bit more about what I call your CEO story. What led you to get started with your business?

Hunter Thompson 01:33

Yeah, to be honest with you, a lot of people talk about 2008 in the investment world as being their big moment. It was a big moment for me, but not for the reason it was for a lot of people, I think that I was insulated from what was going on with the economy, I was still in college in 2008. So when that happened, I basically was fascinated by the amount of opportunity that was presented just based on looking at things from a historical basis.

And just also intuitively understanding that there was going to be an opportunity when blood was in the streets, I thought it was a very pronounced version of blood being in the streets. So what happened was, I jumped all in, focusing first on education, learning as much as I could about stocks, bonds, etc., and invested and had success as most people did investing in 2008. But it wasn't until 2010, that I really had my kind of last straw moment with the stock market.

And this is something that a lot of people don't talk about. But for me, it was just extremely pronounced, as the European debt crisis. So I had experienced some gains coming out of 2009 lows or so and thought I was well on my way to building a career in the stock market. Basically, 2010 happened, which meant there was incredible volatility in the European markets was very similar to what the United States focused on, and dealt with in 2008.

And things like central banks were freezing up in Europe, but it was causing the US markets to go completely insane. And I remember watching CNBC, and they're talking about the Greece bond yields all of a sudden as if this was important, and I should have known, they're saying, if the Greece bond yields remain below 7%, the S&P 500 is going to be fine. But if it goes above 7%, the S&P 500 is going to collapse.

And I was thinking, under what circumstance was I going to be able to predict that or mitigate that risk? Or like, How can I control this is the whole point. That's when I really started just trying to find a simplistic investment vehicle where just an individual person or a small company could actually mitigate the risks associated with the investment which quickly led me to real estate.

Gresham Harkless 03:31

Nice, and I definitely can, speak to be and also in school in 2008, when that was happening and insulated as well. And then I too, didn't go into real estate, but I've read so much. I had no idea. But I remember hearing one of the big things I think I read from Robert Kiyosaki's book was that a lot of the Fortune 500 companies were actually founded during an economic depression.

So a lot of times like he kind of spoke to when those things happen, there is actually a tremendous amount of opportunity. A lot of people make a tremendous amount of headway largely due to that. But as you said, I think anytime you're thinking about putting your money into something, you want to be able to kind of understand it, at least to a degree, and to have all these different moving parts that you have nothing, I have no idea exactly what is really hard and can kind of lead to some sleepless nights I imagined.

Hunter Thompson 04:14

Exactly. And I just didn't feel like it was necessary to expose myself to those kinds of risks to get returns that I thought were achievable otherwise. Now at the time, I didn't really know it was out there. But thankfully I actually moved to California at that time, and California was devastated by the real estate collapse there. You know, I think like 50% of all the foreclosures in the United States that took place at that time, were only in five states, while it was really really pronounced, in California was one of them.

And I reason I say that for two reasons. Number one, valuations were very favorable in California at the time because prices were really depressed. But more importantly, a lot of people lost their shirts. And so when I started learning about this business, and I started networking with people, I quickly found myself networking with very successful individuals who were able to weather that storm, that's something that I got to be always grateful for. I built my career based on what I learned from my mentors and people that I ended up becoming good friends with.

Gresham Harkless 05:08

Yeah, that makes perfect sense. So I know you touched on it a little bit. Can you drill a little bit deeper? Tell us a little bit more about your business. And also, of course, about your podcast.

Hunter Thompson 05:16

Yeah, sure. So I'm the founder of Asym Capital. And basically, we take a passive approach to investing. So what this means is that typically, in real estate, you may have a situation where you buy a property, you may even have a property manager to manage that property. But if something goes wrong with the property, the property manager will call you. Okay, that's what I continue, I consider that an active investment. The types of investments that we have. Invest in commercial properties where there's an extra layer between the passive investors and the property.

So you have the property, like, let's say, a multifamily property, and then a property manager, and that property manager interfaces with a quote, operating partner, or an operator. But under no circumstance does the operator call the passive investor and say, hey, something's wrong with the toilet, we need your help, you need to fix this. So what happens is, that you can participate in these incredibly lucrative deals, mobile, Home Park business, Self Storage, business, office, retail, etc.

But you don't have to be an expert in those particular asset classes. And this just opens up the door so that you can be actually diversified. Because what I saw that was taking place in the stock market is that none of this stuff is actually different. Like if Apple takes a dive, everything takes a dive. And if something big happens in the economic market, like if there's a challenge with Greece's bond yields, for example, everyone's going to suffer.

But with the self-storage business, for example, if the property is rented, you're making money. If it's not, you're not in, it doesn't matter what happens with decreased bond yields, it just simply doesn't. So you're limiting the amount of unknowns, and therefore you're limiting the risk. So I really like being able to do that, because you can diversify into a variety of different asset classes. But at the same time, you don't have to dedicate your entire life to learning only about office complexes in southeastern Florida, you can rely on someone who spent their whole life focusing on that and invest passively with them.

Gresham Harkless 07:01

That makes perfect sense. A lot of times I say, success is a team sport. And a lot of times, you know, making sure that you have the team here, I believe lean into people's are on people's expertise and in their you know, things that have happened in their lives and their businesses and all the things that they've read, then you can increase the likelihood of you being a success, you can always guarantee but you can also increase it because that's what you're trying to do- trying to increase that likelihood of that happening.

Hunter Thompson 07:22

100%, I'm a huge proponent of that as well. You know, Dan Sullivan is someone that I look up to a lot, he talks about unique ability and I think that if my unique ability is communicating with investors, talking with investors, that's what I'm gonna spend most of my time doing. If I enjoy doing podcast interviews, for example, which I do, I'm happy to do this. Now, we leverage the background of operating partners that specialize in those particular niches, and we kind of get the best of both worlds.

Gresham Harkless 07:47

Right. Absolutely. Your zone of genius. And, it might even be related to what I was going to ask you next, which is like your secret sauce, and it can be for you or your organization. But what do you feel kind of sets you apart or makes you unique?

Hunter Thompson 07:58

Well, I mean, look, the real estate sector is very competitive, right, it always attracts the best of the best. And the reason for that is very lucrative, right? You can make a lot of money, you can generate wealth, you can provide cash flow, it's tax-deferred, etc. So I don't have to pitch you guys on that, most people are familiar with that. But I particularly like the podcast medium, even within the podcast medium, again, very saturated, very competitive. Our podcast is really focused on the extra layer of depth. So when we have conversations with industry leaders, we're going to ask those third, fourth, and fifth questions to actually give you the level of expertise that an expert would have.

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So our podcast is an amazing podcast, if you're actually interested in becoming an expert in the real estate sector, to some degree, now, if you're just interested in kind of casually learning about real estate, you want to know, you know what it means to invest in real estate or something like that. There are plenty of great podcasts out there. That's not really what ours is. But this has resulted in something really fascinating. I didn't intend to create a podcast that was focused on depth, I just created a podcast that I knew that I would learn something during every interview.

And so that's my motivating factor, I love to have really detailed conversations with industry leaders. But the result has been that it's actually made a much more scalable business for myself, and my firm because the listeners are highly educated. So when we get on a conference call with them, we talk about the details of investment. They're very, very convinced not only of just generally speaking, you know, passive investing, for example, or the benefits of investing in a particular asset class, even the details because they know where to look.

So it's resulted in an infrastructure that attracts highly curated investors that are ready to invest. And then they see the podcast and the material that we put out. And I frequently have investors go through our entire investment process, investing $200,000 that have never spoken to me before. Why? Because they know me intimately because of all the work we put out there with the podcast medium and a variety of other things.

Gresham Harkless 09:56

Exactly. That makes perfect sense. So I wanted to switch gears a little bit and I wanted to ask you for what I call a CEO hack. And this might be an app or book or a habit that you have. But what's something that makes you more effective and efficient?

Hunter Thompson 10:08

So, there's probably been a lot of books mentioned a lot of times in this program. So I'll try to give you a couple that haven't been mentioned before. Double Double by Cameron Herald, I think is my favorite business book. He is the CEO of God Junk, he has been an incredible author, and another book he wrote is Miracle Morning for Entrepreneurs.

Gresham Harkless 10:27

Nice. I appreciate that. Yeah. Because you always need to have that opportunity to kind of leverage that if you can make whatever that is and into something that's tangible, which sounds like that book does, where you're actually hearing from an entrepreneur and business owner that's been successful and what exactly they're doing. And that definitely helps out as far as doing that. I appreciate you for sharing that heck with us. And now I want to ask you for what I call a CEO nugget. And this is a word of wisdom or a piece of advice. Or if you can happen to a time machine. What would you tell your younger business self?

Hunter Thompson 10:51

Hey, so I'm not going to hop into the time machine because I don't want to butterfly effect myself out of where I currently am. But I will say that who not how has been an incredible way of thinking about things. There are so many of you guys who have done tremendous interviews with high performers in a variety of sectors, there are many, many ways to make money, and there are many, many ways to be productive. There are many, many ways to run a business.

What you don't want to do is be an amalgamation of all of these people's suggestions. So I would find a couple of people that you feel just speak intimately to your gut, and go all in on their perspective, use their successes and playbook, go directly towards them. If you find a situation where they went left when you want to go right, find someone who went right at that pivot point and follow their success. And so it's not about the strategy. It's about identifying the people and replicating their moves.

Gresham Harkless 11:43

Absolutely. Yeah, that makes perfect sense. I appreciate you for sharing that with us. Because a lot of times, these things that you hear are simply ingredients and you figure out what you want to cook, what you want to repair, you figure out what ingredients work best for that and not try to fit everything in the grocery store into your recipe.

Hunter Thompson 11:56

Yes, 100%.

Gresham Harkless 11:59

And I wanted to ask you now my absolute favorite question, which is the definition of what it means to be a CEO. And we're hoping to have different, quote and quote, CEOs on the show. So Hunter, what does being a CEO mean to you?

Hunter Thompson 12:09

Man, to be honest with you, the thing that came to mind when you asked that question is I love being able to focus on different initiatives on my own schedule, right? So if I find an interesting idea, I can try that without having oversight and saying, no we're not going to dedicate resources to that. So that's really my definition. Like, one example of this is I'm in the process of writing a book. And the reason I get to do that is because I decided that I thought it was gonna be a good use of my resources. That is what I love about owning a business.

Gresham Harkless 12:37

Yeah, absolutely. And I think that a lot of times when you're in another kind of rounds or even positions, sometimes you were told you can't do XYZ, or it's not profitable, or it's not worthwhile. But I think for one, that's where sometimes true innovation happens. And sometimes we get to break down barriers we never thought of, and then as you spoke, get an opportunity to kind of create that piece of content or book or whatever it might be, something that's one of the most exciting things about being a CEO.

Hunter Thompson 13:03

Can I add something to that real quick, because I think your listeners would be sympathetic to this? I mean, I had, as we all have, some scary moments in my progression towards entrepreneurship. For me, the most serious moment was when I was working at a company that helped Realtors get on the first page of Google. So in a sales position, I had an injury and my right shoulder and had to get an MRI done. Okay, I went in on Thursday and said, Hey, look, I'm not going to be able to come in on Friday, because I have to get an MRI, right? Here's my doctor's note or whatever.

And the way that they looked at me was like if a four-year-old said that he just took a shot of Captain Morgan's. It was like, you didn't talk to HR, like you didn't give us two weeks notice that you're gonna miss this one day. It was like, maybe that's common in the corporate world, you know, I don't know. But I knew that that wasn't going to be my future. You know what I mean?

And so that's what it means for me to be a CEO is that if something goes wrong, or if I have some challenges come up, there's the freedom to make that choice. So if y'all are listening to this, and you didn't want to jump over the hump. I'm telling you, there is tremendous volatility in the world of entrepreneurship the freedom is incredible. Absolutely incredible.

Gresham Harkless 14:13

Yeah, absolutely. I appreciate you for sharing that with us. Because I think a lot of times, you know, I am a big believer and things happen for a reason. So not to say that specific thing happened for a reason. But I think we when we have the perspective that everything happens for us, not necessarily to us, we start to see that those little small things are shown to us sometimes early on, to make us make some of those decisions that we make.

So definitely, I appreciate you for telling that story. Because I think we have things that might be in our lives that happen. We might ignore those signs so to speak, but it's important to kind of see that and understand that and build whatever we want. If we don't like the company we work for then maybe you know, we have a great opportunity to kind of build something that can have the values that we are working on ourselves.

Hunter Thompson 14:52

Yeah, absolutely.

Gresham Harkless 14:54

Nice. Well, Hunter, thank you so much for your time. What I wanted to do was pass you the mic so to speak, just to see if there's anything out there Know, you can let our readers and listeners know. And then of course, how best they can get a hold of you and listen to your podcast.

Hunter Thompson 15:05

Yeah, well, I mean, first of all, like I mentioned, I think going all in is really, the key. There are basically two options you can go all in or you can make excuses. And at every stage of everyone's career, there's always someone that's more successful than them. And every time you see them as humans, what you want to do is say, well, they're more successful than me because of x.

And that's just it, and you can check out and that's the easiest cop and trust me, you know, like the people that I've been able to work with, it happens at the highest level. So if you're raising a $100 million fund, which is like a massive fund in my business, and there's someone that has a $500 million fund, the person with $100 million fund goes, Oh, no, yeah, well, he's politically connected or whatever. It's just like a cop-out. It's like, Dude, you have no reason to cop out, you're clearly a high performer.

So don't let that happen at your level either. And, again, I cannot stress that enough.

And in terms of contacting, you can find our educational resources at cashflowconnections.com. The podcast in iTunes is cash flow connections. That's three words. And if you're interested in investing or learning about our investment opportunities, it's AsymCapital.com.

Gresham Harkless 16:09

Awesome. Well, thank you so much, Hunter. We'll make sure to have those links as well in the show notes so that everybody can check it out. And follow up with you download and listen to the podcast. But again, appreciate all the awesome things you're doing and appreciate your time even more, and I hope you have a phenomenal rest of the day.

Outro 16:22

Thank you for listening to the I AM CEO Podcast powered by Blue 16 Media. Tune in next time and visit us at iamceo.co I AM CEO is not just a phrase, it's a community. Be sure to follow us on social media and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes Google Play and everywhere you listen to podcasts, SUBSCRIBE, and leave us a five-star rating grab CEO gear at www.ceogear.co. This has been the I AM CEO Podcast with Gresham Harkless. Thank you for listening.

Intro 00:02

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Do you want to learn effective ways to build relationships, generate sales and grow your business from successful entrepreneurs, startups, and CEOs without listening to a long, long, long interview? If so, you've come to the right place. Gresham Harkless values your time and is ready to share with you precisely the information you're in search of. This is the I AM CEO Podcast.

Gresham Harkless 00:29

Hello, this is Gresh from the I AM CEO podcast and I have a very special guest on the show today, I have Hunter Thompson of Asym Capital, Hunter it's awesome to have you on the show.

Hunter Thompson 00:38

Thanks again for having me on.

Gresham Harkless 00:40

No problem. Super excited to have you on it. What I wanted to do was just read a little bit more about Hunter so you can hear about all the awesome things that he's doing. And Hunter is a full time real estate investor and founder of Asym Capital, a private equity firm based out of Los Angeles, California. Since starting Asym, Hunter has helped more than 250 investors allocate capital to over 100 properties. He has personally raised over $30 million in private capital in controls more than 75 million in commercial real estate. Hunter has been featured in Forbes, Globe Street, Inside Self Storage, as well as a variety of other media outlets, podcasts and radio shows. Hunter is also the host of the cash flow connections real estate podcast, which helps investors learn the intricacies of commercial real estate from the comfort of their home, car or even their office. Hunter, are you ready speak to the I AM CEO community?

Hunter Thompson 01:26

Oh, yeah, let's do it.

Gresham Harkless 01:28

So to kick everything off, I want to hear a little bit more about what I call your CEO story. What led you to get started with your business?

Hunter Thompson 01:33

Yeah, so I mean, to be honest with you, a lot of people talk about 2008 in the investment world as being their big moment. It was a big moment for me, but not for the reason it was for a lot of people, I think that I was insulated from what was going on with the economy, I was still in college in 2008. So when that happened, I basically was fascinated by the amount of opportunity that was presented just based on looking things in from historical basis. And just also intuitively understanding that there was going to be an opportunity when blood was in the streets, I thought it was very pronounced version of blood being in the streets. So what happened was, I jumped all in, you know, focusing first on education, learning as much as I could about stocks, bonds, etc. and invested and had success as most people did investing in 2008. But it wasn't until 2010, that I really had my kind of last straw moment with the stock market. And this is something that a lot of people don't talk about. But for me, it was just extremely pronounced, was the European debt crisis. So I had experienced some gains coming out of 2009 lows or so and thought I was well on my way to building career in the stock market. And basically 2010 happened, which meant there was incredible volatility in the European markets was very similar to what the United States focused on, dealt with in 2008. And things like central banks were freezing up in Europe, but it was causing the US markets to go completely insane. And I remember watching CNBC, and they're talking about the Greece bond yields all the sudden as if this was important, and I should have known, they're saying, if the Greece bond yields remain below 7%, the s&p 500 is going to be fine. But if it goes above 7%, the s&p 500 was going to collapse. And I was thinking, under what circumstance was I going to be able to predict that or mitigate that risk? Or like, How can I control this, this is the whole point. And that's when I really started just trying to find a simplistic investment vehicle where just an individual person or a small company could actually mitigate the risks associated with the investment that quickly led me to real estate.

Gresham Harkless 03:31

Nice, and I definitely can, you know, speak to be and also in school in 2008, when that was happening and insulated as well. And then I too, I didn't go into real estate, but I've read so much. I had no idea. But I remember hearing one of the big things I think I read from like a Robert Kiyosaki book was that a lot of the fortune 500 companies were actually founded during a like an economic depression. So a lot of times like he kind of spoke to when those things happen, there is actually a tremendous amount of opportunity. A lot of people make a tremendous amount of headway largely due to that. But like you said, I think anytime you're thinking about putting your money into something, you want to be able to kind of understand it, at least to a degree, and to have all these different moving parts that you have nothing, I have no idea exactly what does what is really hard and can kind of lead to some sleepless nights I imagined.

Hunter Thompson 04:14

Exactly. And I just didn't feel like it was necessary to expose myself to those kinds of risks to get returns that I thought were achievable otherwise. Now at the time, I didn't really know it was out there. But thankfully, you know, I actually moved to California at that time, and California was devastated by the real estate collapse there. You know, I think like 50% of all the foreclosures in the United States that took place at that time, were only in five states, while it was really, really pronounced in California was one of them. And I reason I say that as for two reasons. Number one, valuations were very favorable in California at the time because prices were really depressed. But more importantly, a lot of people lost their shirt. And so when I started learning about this business, and I started networking with people, I quickly found myself networking with very successful individuals that were able to weather that storm, that's something that I got to be always grateful about. Because I built my career based on what I learned from my mentors, people that I ended up becoming good friends with.

Gresham Harkless 05:08

Yeah, that makes perfect sense. So I know you touched on it a little bit. Can you drill a little bit deeper? Tell us a little bit more about your business? And also, of course, about your podcast?

Hunter Thompson 05:16

Yeah, sure. So I'm the founder of Asym Capital. And basically, we take a passive approach to investing. So what this means is that typically, in real estate, you may have a situation where you buy a property, you may even have a property manager to manage that property. But if something goes wrong with the property, the property manager will call you. Okay, that's what I continue, I consider that an active investment. The types of investments that we have, we invest in commercial properties, where there's an extra layer between the passive investors and the property. So you have the property, like, let's say, a multifamily property, and then a property manager, and that property manager interfaces with a, quote, operating partner or a operator. But under no circumstance does the operator call the passive investor and say, hey, something's wrong with the toilet, we need your help, you need to fix this. So what happens is, you can participate in these incredibly lucrative deals, mobile, Home Park business, the Self Storage, business, office, retail, etc. But you don't have to be an expert in those particular asset classes. And this just opens up the door so that you can be actually diversified. Because what I saw what was taking place in the stock market is that none of this stuff is actually different. Like if Apple takes a dive, everything takes a dive. And if something big happens in the economic market, like if there's a challenge with Greece bond yields, for example, everyone's going to suffer. But with the Self Storage business, for example, if the property is rented, you're making money. If it's not, you're not in, it doesn't matter what happens with decrease bond yields, it just simply doesn't. So you're limiting the amount of unknowns, and therefore you're limiting the risk. So I really like being able to do that, because you can diversify into a variety of different asset classes. But at the same time, you don't have to dedicate your entire life to learning only about office complexes in southeastern Florida, you can rely on someone that spent their whole life focusing on that and invest passively with them.

Gresham Harkless 07:01

That makes perfect sense. A lot of times I say, success is a team sport. And a lot of times, you know, making sure that you have the team here, I believe lean into people's are on people's expertise and in their you know, things that have happened in their lives and their businesses and all the things that they've read, then you can increase the likelihood of you being success, you can always guarantee but you can also increase it, because that's what you're trying to do is try to increase that likelihood of that happening.

Hunter Thompson 07:22

100%, I'm a huge proponent of that as well. You know, Dan Sullivan is someone that I look up to a lot, he talks about unique ability, you know, and I think that if my unique ability is communicating with investors, talking with investors, that's what I'm gonna spend most of my time doing. If I enjoy doing podcast interviews, for example, which I do, I'm happy to do this. Now, we leverage the background of operating partners that specialize in those particular niches, and we kind of get the best of both worlds.

Gresham Harkless 07:47

Right. Absolutely. Your zone of genius. And, and it might even be related to what I was going to ask you next, which is like your secret sauce, and it can be for you or your organization. But what do you feel kind of sets you apart or makes you unique?

Hunter Thompson 07:58

Well, I mean, look, the real estate sector is very competitive, right, it always attracts the best of the best. And the reason for that is very lucrative, right? You can make a lot of money, you can generate wealth, you can provide cash flow, it's tax deferred, etc. So I don't have to pitch you guys on that most people are familiar with that. But I particularly like the podcast medium, even within the podcast medium, again, very saturated, very competitive. Our podcast is really focused on the extra layer of depth. So when we have conversations with industry leaders, we're going to ask those third, fourth, fifth questions to actually give you the level of expertise that an expert would have. So our podcast is an amazing podcast, if you're actually interested in becoming an expert in the real estate sector, so some degree, now, if you're just interested in kind of casually learning about real estate, you want to know, you know what it means to invest in real estate or something like that. There's plenty of great podcasts out there. That's not really what ours is. But this has resulted in something really fascinating. I didn't intend to create a podcast that was focused on depth, I just created a podcast that I knew that I would learn something during every interview. And so that's my motivating factor, I love to have really detailed conversations with industry leaders. But the result has been that it's actually made a much more scalable business for myself, my firm, because the listeners are highly educated. So when we get on a conference call with them, we talk about the details of investment. They're very, very convinced not only of just generally speaking, you know, passive investing, for example, or the benefits of investing in a particular asset class, even the details because they know where to look. So it's resulted in an infrastructure which attracts highly curated investors that are ready to invest. And then they see the podcast and the material that we put out. And I frequently have investors go through our entire investment process, invest $200,000 that have never spoken to me before. Why? Because they know me intimately, because all the work we put out there with the podcast medium and a variety of other things.

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Gresham Harkless 09:56

Exactly. That makes perfect sense. So I wanted to switch gears a little bit and I wanted to ask you for what I call a CEO hack. And this might be an app or book or a habit that you have. But what's something that makes you more effective and efficient?

Hunter Thompson 10:08

So, there's probably been a lot of books mentioned a lot of times in this program. So I'll try to give you a couple that haven't been mentioned before. Double Double by Cameron Herald, I think is my favorite business book. He is the CEO of God Junk, he has been an incredible author and another book that he wrote his Miracle Morning for entrepreneurs.

Gresham Harkless 10:27

Nice. I appreciate that. Yeah. Because you always need to have that opportunity to kind of leverage that if you can make whatever that is and into something that's tangible, which sounds like that book does, where you're actually hearing from an entrepreneur and business owner that's been successful and and what exactly they're doing. And that definitely helps out as far as doing that. I appreciate you for sharing that heck with us. And and now I want to ask you for what I call a CEO nugget. And this is a word of wisdom or a piece of advice. Or if you can happen to a time machine. What would you tell your younger business self?

Hunter Thompson 10:51

Hey, so I'm not going to hop into the time machine because I'm very, I don't want to butterfly myself a butterfly effect myself out of where I currently am. But I will say that who not how has been an incredible way of thinking about things. There's so many you guys have done tremendous interviews with high performers in a variety of sectors, there's many, many ways to make money, there's many, many ways to be productive. There's many, many ways to run a business. What you don't want to do is be an amalgamation of all of these people's suggestions. So I would find a couple of people that you feel just speak intimately to you to your gut, and go all in on their perspective, use their successes and playbook go directly towards them. If you find a situation where they went left, when you want to go right, find someone who went right at that pivot point and follow their success. And so it's not about the strategy. It's about identifying the people and replicating their their moves.

Gresham Harkless 11:43

Absolutely. Yeah, that makes perfect sense. I appreciate you for sharing that with us. Because a lot of times, you know, these things that you hear are simply ingredients and you figure out what you want to cook what you want to repair, you figure out what ingredients work best for that and not try to fit everything in the grocery store into your recipe.

Hunter Thompson 11:56

Yes, 100%.

Gresham Harkless 11:59

And I wanted to ask you now my absolute favorite question, which is the definition of what it means to be a CEO. And we're hoping to have different, quote unquote, CEOs on the show. So Hunter, what does being a CEO mean to you?

Hunter Thompson 12:09

Man, to be honest with you, the thing that came to mind when you ask that question is I love being able to focus on different initiatives on my own schedule, right? So if I find an interesting idea, I can try that without having oversight and saying, no we're not going to dedicate resources to that. So that's really my definition. Like, one example of this is I'm in the process of writing a book. And the reason I get to do that is because I decided that I thought it was gonna be a good use of my resources. That is what I love about owning a business.

Gresham Harkless 12:37

Yeah, absolutely. And I think that a lot of times when you're in other kind of rounds, or even positions, sometimes you were told you can't do XYZ, or it's not profitable, or it's not worthwhile. But I think for one, that's where sometimes true innovation happens. And sometimes we get to break down barriers we never thought of, and then like you spoke to, you know, get an opportunity to kind of create that that piece of content or book or whatever it might be, is really, you know, something that's one of the most exciting things about being a CEO.

Hunter Thompson 13:03

Can I add something to that real quick, because I think your listeners would be sympathetic to this. I mean, I had as we all have some scary moments in my progression towards entrepreneurship. And for me, the most serious moment was I was working at a company that helped Realtors get on Google on the first page of Google. So as a sales position, and I had an injury and my right shoulder and had to get an MRI done. Okay, I went in on Thursday and said, Hey, look, I'm not going to be able to come in on Friday, because I have to get an MRI, right? Here's my doctor's note or whatever. And the way that they looked at me was like, if a four year old said that he just took a shot of Captain Morgan's. It was like, You didn't like talk to HR, like you didn't give us two weeks notice that you're gonna miss this one day. It was like, I just maybe that's common in the corporate world, you know, I don't know. But I knew that that wasn't going to be my future. You know what I mean? And so that's what it means for me to be a CEO is that if something goes wrong, or if I have some challenge come up. It's like, there's the freedom to make that choice. So if y'all are listening to this, and you haven't, you didn't want to jump over the hump. I'm telling you, there is tremendous volatility in the world of entrepreneurship of the freedom is incredible. Absolutely incredible.

Gresham Harkless 14:13

Yeah, absolutely. I appreciate you for sharing that with us. Because I think a lot of times, you know, I am a big believer and things happen for a reason. So not to say that specific thing happened for a reason. But I think we can, you know, when we have the perspective that everything happens for us, not necessarily to us, we start to see that those little small things are shown to us sometimes early on, to make us make some of those decisions that we make. So I think, definitely, I appreciate you for telling that story. Because I think we have things that might be in our lives that happen. We might ignore those signs so to speak, but it's important to kind of see that and understand that and build whatever we want. If we don't like the company we work for then maybe you know, we have a great opportunity to kind of build something that can have the values that we are working on ourselves.

Hunter Thompson 14:52

Yeah, absolutely.

Gresham Harkless 14:54

Nice. Well, Hunter, thank you so much for your time. What I wanted to do was pass you the mic so to speak, just to see if there's anything out there Know, you can let our readers and listeners know. And then of course, how best they can get a hold of you and listen to your podcast.

Hunter Thompson 15:05

Yeah, well, I mean, first of all, like I mentioned, I think going all in is really, the key. There's basically two options where you can go all in or you can make excuses. And at every stage of everyone's career, there's always someone that's more successful than them. And every time you see them as humans, what you want to do is say, well, they're more successful than me because of x. And that's just it, and you can check out and that's the easiest cop out and trust me, you know, like the people that I've been able to work with, it happens at the highest level. So if you're raising $100 million fund, which is like a massive fund in my business, and there's someone that has a $500 million fund, the person with $100 million fund goes, Oh, no, yeah, well, he's politically connected or whatever. It's just like a cop out. It's like, Dude, you have no reason to cop out, you're clearly like a high performer. So don't let that happen at your level either. And, again, it just I cannot stress that enough. And in terms of contacting, you can find our educational resources at cashflowconnections.com. The podcast in iTunes is cash flow connections. That's three words. And if you're interested investing or learning about our investment opportunities, it's Asym Capital.com.

Gresham Harkless 16:09

Awesome. Well, thank you so much Hunter. We'll make sure to have those links as well in the show notes so that everybody can check it out. And follow up with you download and listen to the podcast. But again, appreciate all the awesome things you're doing and appreciate your time even more, and I hope you have a phenomenal rest of the day.

Outro 16:22

Thank you for listening to the I AM CEO Podcast powered by Blue 16 Media. Tune in next time and visit us at iamceo.co I AM CEO is not just a phrase, it's a community. Be sure to follow us on social media and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes Google Play and everywhere you listen to podcasts, SUBSCRIBE, and leave us a five-star rating grab CEO gear at www.ceogear.co. This has been the I AM CEO Podcast with Gresham Harkless. Thank you for listening.

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Mercy - CBNation Team

This is a post from a CBNation team member. CBNation is a Business to Business (B2B) Brand. We are focused on increasing the success rate. We create content and information focusing on increasing the visibility of and providing resources for CEOs, entrepreneurs and business owners. CBNation consists of blogs(CEOBlogNation.com), podcasts, (CEOPodcasts.com) and videos (CBNation.tv). CBNation is proudly powered by Blue16 Media.

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